Password Manager vs. Autofill

What is the difference between just having a browser save and autofill passwords, and using a password manager?

You could say the biggest difference between browser stored passwords and password managers is password managers allow you to manage your credentials. If you need to change your password or update your account information, password managers can do this a lot easier than the browser password saver. To name a few other things:

  • Password Managers can be used and synced across many devices.
  • Some Password Managers have an auto password changer for certain compromised accounts. For example, if LinkedIn gets hacked, compromising millions of accounts, the Password Manager will automatically change your password ensuring your account stays safe.
  • Built-in password auditing to make sure passwords are not being shared by accounts and are up to industry standard.
  • Autofill features just like in the browser.
  • Allows for storage of other sensitive information other than passwords and usernames.
  • Provides password generator to ensure passwords are as secure as possible.

Generally, a password manager is a much better way to keep track of your passwords and ensure they are all secure and up to industry standard.

Browser-saved password don’t offer a lot and can sometimes lead people into the pitfalls of poor password management.


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CSS frequently publishes blog posts which are written by our team from their observations in the field, at conferences and through experiences with compliance professionals. These posts are designed to further knowledge and share industry best practices. Topics run the gamut, including Form ADV, cybersecurity, MiFID II, position limit monitoring, technology challenges and more. Complete and submit the brief form below to receive notifications when we publish new content.

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